Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Startup-People of Seattle: Brian McIlwain (CTO)

The blog-series “Startup People of Seattle” introduces some of the key personas in the ecosystem to learn more about what they are doing, to share their thoughts and ideas, and to promote networking. 


In our sixth interview, meet Brian McIlwain:
“Everything is available for free online, i.e. on YouTube. I usually start there when trying to learn about anything.”
Brian McIlwain angel invests in early-stage companies by providing CTO and software consulting services for an affordable dollar rate and accepting the rest in equity.




Q: Could you please shortly introduce yourself?
A: I have a tech background, but I am also into finance and business. I have been a software consultant for half a decade working with small companies and Fortune 500 companies. I love the fast environment startups operate in. Right now, I am actively working as CTO for two startups. Additionally, I am in an advising role for some more startups. The asset that I can provide as an advisor is that I can maintain the roadmap for the technical execution. This is much less time intensive then actually executing on the roadmap, but it is very important for startups to get this right. 
Q: What makes a startup interesting to you?
A: Both the companies that I am involved with as CTO have a very similar founding story. In both cases the founder someday realized that their jobs could be eliminated by an app. I like those kinds of entrepreneurs, because they are familiar with the problem that they are trying to solve and the market that they operate in.
Q: On LinkedIn you say you “angel invest”. Could you tell me more about that?
A: I do angel investing even though I am not accredited. Instead of investing my money, I invest my time, meaning that I will work for startups for a discounted rate plus equity.
Q: How would you go about learning more about startups?
A: Everything is available for free online, i.e. on YouTube. I usually start there when trying to learn about anything. There are book summary videos for example that I like to watch, or even authors talking about the key ideas described in their books. Learning about a topic through YouTube usually provides me with a good overview. If there are certain aspects that I want to learn more about, books can be a good resource.
Some of the YouTube-channels I follow are: 
  • “Productivity Game”
  • “startupschool”
  • “The Minority Mindset”
Some of the books I’d recommend reading are:
  • “Zero to One” by Peter Thiel
  • “Rich Dad Poor Dad” by Robert T. Kiyosaki
  • “How to win friends & influence people” by Dale Carnegie
  • “To Sell is Human” by Daniel H. Pink
  • “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill
  • “The Effective Executive” by Peter Drucker
The resources I mentioned are not all specific to startups, but I think they are worth looking at. What these resources have in common is that their core message is contradictory to what common wisdoms dictates is right. One core concept that I have learned is that in areas of finance and business the majority's way will almost never be ideal. This is because otherwise, supply and demand would rebalance the profit margins to make the average person's performance, well, average. Therefore, if you wish to perform better than average you must do at least some things that the majority thinks will never work or at least would be unwilling to try. Then, you have to prove that your contrarian belief is indeed correct or more profitable than the common wisdom, usually by winning in the market.
Aside from the resources I mentioned, I think mentors can add a lot to one’s personal growth. I have been lucky to have had great mentors, for example Bryan Starbuck, a serial CTO. 
I also enjoy going to meetups, like the Open Coffee that John Sechrest hosts every Tuesday morning at Galvanize. This is a great opportunity to share some thoughts and discuss topics. Aside from that, meetups are a great for networking.
Q: What are some examples for interesting organizations in Seattle’s startup ecosystem in your opinion?
A: There is a new angel investing group called Gaudium Capital. They focus on fintech, blockchain and AI. What makes them stand out I think, is that they are very well connected and that they provide highly capital-intensive resources for very cheap. The founder of Guardian Capital is Alvaro Jimenez.


My key take-away from this interview:
  • Today, education does not have to be expensive anymore. There is an unlimited amount of resources available online. YouTube can be a good starting point that allows to get a good overview. Once I know what aspect I want to learn more about, it makes sense to invest time in reading a book.


In the interview Brian mentioned some resources and organizations he finds helpful, find out more about them here:


About Seattle Angel:
A strong ecosystem creates an environment that allows startups to thrive. Seattle Angel’s goal is to strengthen Seattle’s startup ecosystem by increasing the access to funding for entrepreneurs to push their ideas further.


Seattle Angel Conference:
SAC round XVI is about to start. Are you an entrepreneur looking to get about $200k in angel funding? Are you curious to learn more about pitching, to polish all the documents needed for investments and to receive great feedback? Or are you an accredited business angel who wants to learn more about angel investing and due diligence? In any of these cases you should consider reaching out to us. You can find more information here: https://www.seattleangelconference.com/
For any questions please reach out to: sechrest@gmail.com


About the author: Sven Goepfrich

https://www.linkedin.com/in/svengoepfrich/

Sven Goepfrich is currently finishing his MBA in Syracuse. His studies focus on technology, innovation and entrepreneurship. At his school, he is working for the department of finance. Sven was actively interning with the Seattle Angel Conference in summer 2019. He is currently looking for full-time career opportunities in this field.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Startup-People of Seattle: Nate Doran (Business Angel, VC)

The blog-series “Startup People of Seattle” introduces some of the key personas in the ecosystem to learn more about what they are doing, to share their thoughts and ideas, and to promote networking.



In our fifth interview, meet Nate Doran:
“I think angel funds are important because without them, for many angel investors, to be able to build a big enough portfolio, they can’t make enough individual investments.”
Nate Doran is the Business Director at SWAN Venture Fund. He manages the investment process there.





Q: Could you tell me a bit more about your background, especially when it comes to entrepreneurship?
A: During my MBA at the University of Washington, I started a company through a business plan competition. However, the business model was flawed, and the team didn’t work out, so we shut the company down after one year. Following this experience, I volunteered with Northwest Energy Angels (renamed Element 8 Angels) for two years while finishing my MBA. I helped them with due diligence and the screening of companies. From there I was recruited into Keiretsu. After 2 years, I was talking with Jim Reed about a fund and we started SWAN Venture Fund with 23 investors.
Q: It is interesting that you have been on the investment side very early on. How did that come?
A: Four years ago, I strongly felt like there was a gap in funding in the Seattle startup ecosystem. There were many articles about this at the time. Additionally, while working with Keiretsu, many of the more successful-in-fund-raising entrepreneurs hit a ceiling at $2.000.000 and could not raise any more money here. Some of these companies were VC-class companies that could be funded if a VC had a fitting investment thesis. I recognized this problem as an opportunity and decided to go on the investment side rather than founding a company, which was an alternative for me at the time.
Q: How do you think the investment situation looks like today in Seattle’s startup ecosystem?
A: There has been a lot more VC activity recently. We have Pioneer Square Labs, Flying Fish, Unlock, Founders’ Co-op and a few others. A lot of them are focused on specific software themes though. Therefore, I still think that there are holes in the local private capital markets infrastructure, especially as the market changes. As far as the angel market goes, some names in town are Alliance of Angels, Puget Sound Venture Club, and SeaChange Fund.
Q: Could you talk some about the SWAN Venture Fund?
A: Our first fund was very small. We are talking about a million-dollar fund. Therefore, the structure was atypical. One company died already, and we have a few zombie-class companies, but we also have six or seven companies that still show potential with two seeming very promising. CurvaFix (https://curvafix.com/) is a medical device company and we hope to return our fund from that investment. DefinedCrowd (https://www.definedcrowd.com/) could be a unicorn. So, I think the first fund is doing very well. As a result of this success, 16 out of the 24 investors invested in our second fund again. In the second fund we had a total of 35 investors, and it ended up being a $1.085.000 fund. We are still investing into companies through our second fund. The third fund that I am working on with Jim Reed, Richard Samuelson, and a few others right now will be a Venture Capital fund. However, we will probably form another angel fund in the future, too, as this is good for our ecosystem. 
I think angel funds are important because for many angel investors, to be able to build a big enough portfolio, they can’t make enough individual investments. As an angel is starting out, it is tempting to write a lot of big checks quickly. There are two typical stages of attrition, where angels run out of money. The first wave of attrition happens about 2-3 years in when angels run out of money because they weren't disciplined enough, they ran out of cash, or just get distracted by other things. The second wave of attrition happens about 7-8 years into their portfolio, where they are tapped out, illiquid and little to no returns are realized. Some research shows that the angels who last longest spread their risk by investing 1.5%-3% of their net worth into ~10+ companies each year. But, if the minimum check size to get into a deal is $25k and you can only invest $10k into each deal to diversify, the math doesn't work in this case. Therefore, if your wealth doesn’t allow you to invest in enough companies individually with this approach, angel funds are the way to go.
Q: What is SWAN’s investment thesis?
A: The thesis is that there are a number of opportunities in the Pacific Northwest that are overlooked or dismissed by other investors. There are a lot of investment opportunities in the seed/pre-seed stage. We are looking for diversification and rely on the expertise of our members when making investment decisions.
Q: You mentioned diversification as being important. What do you think is the trade-off between investing in fields you are familiar with and diversification?
A: There are two fundamentally different strategies. Some invest in an idea that a specific market is going in a certain direction. Sometimes, these investors are experts who may become very involved in the companies that they invest in (Active). Others are generalists who invest broadly (more passive). Some may pursue a blend of these strategies.
You should also consider that there are many ways to diversify a portfolio. Industry is one of them, but you should also think of opportunities to diversify across time, geography and stage.
Q: What do you think about how involved an angel should be in startups he or she invests in?
A: Sometimes an angel has a vision for a company that is not consistent with what the customers are doing. That can cause problems in the relationship between entrepreneur and investor. I think if an investor wants to be hands-on, he or she should help the startup through making introductions. The angel can also help get resources and give advice to the entrepreneur. If an investor tries to run the business, however, most of the time the angel is crossing a line. As an investor you need to believe in the founders when you invest in them, so you should trust them with the execution.
Q: How would you recommend someone interested in angel investing to learn more about it?
A: I think you should start reading books. I recommend Josh Maher’s book called “Startup Wealth – How the best angel investors make money in startups”. This book highlights some interesting strategies. I think reading some papers from Robert Wiltbank is also helpful. Take-aways from his work are that you must do due diligence and that you should have expertise involved in the process. I think you must understand portfolio theory and investment strategies to be able to develop your own strategy. You should also understand risks and how to mitigate them, and you should at least conceptually understand the importance of check size (Kelly vs Martingale) and exit strategies.
Aside from reading books you must do hands-on work, meaning I’d recommend joining an angel group and participating in some deals before writing a first check. Some angel groups offer training opportunities, which can be helpful early on.
Q: How does a typical due diligence process look like?
A: There are a lot of due diligence checklists out there, but I’ll point out some aspects that investors look at during due diligence. Also, keep in mind that only an ideal due diligence process covers all these aspects, but the reality in angel groups is that due diligence is volunteer work performed by members and sometimes they are not perfectly thorough. Anyone investing off of someone else's due diligence without doing their own homework can get into trouble.
So, during due diligence investors want to make sure to understand the risks involved in a company and to know what they get themselves into. They also want to make sure the entrepreneur understands these risks and is prepared to address them. Investors will evaluate whether there is a product-market fit, whether the entrepreneur solves a significant problem and whether the claims of the entrepreneur are correct. To find these things out, investors do market research and talk to customers. Another important aspect to consider is the scalability of the business model. Often entrepreneurs overestimate the scalability, which leads to overoptimistic predicted revenue streams. Another thing investors are looking at is the technology and whether it works.
Investors typically also want to visit a startup in their workplace to meet the team in their element. The personal fit is very important, so investors must feel like they can work well together with the founding team of a startup. Founders must have a sense of integrity and the team should know each other for a while. It also supports the valuation of a startup if the founding team has startup experience and has successfully founded and exited a company before.
Lastly, the terms of the deal are important and whether those terms fit the investment strategy of an angel investor. Because of terms, a great business isn't always a great investment. In the end, angel investing is also about returns, so the terms of a deal must make a company investable. 



Here are some things I learned from this interview:
  • Angel Funds offer the opportunity of investing smaller amounts of money in many companies, allowing angels to diversify their portfolio. Given that a fund collects “small” amounts from many investors, investments are still meaningful for startups, but this approach allows angels to increase their portfolio diversification given a certain budget. Granted the riskiness of angel investing, this budget should not exceed a certain percentage of the net wealth of an investor. Therefore, Angel Funds are particularly important to angels who are just accredited and couldn’t make enough meaningful individual investments to still diversify enough to mitigate risks.
  • There are two fundamentally different investment strategies when it comes to industry: Focus and diversification.
  • To learn about due diligence, you must understand some theoretical background, but additionally you must do hands-on due diligence before writing a first check.
  • Due diligence is a complex process in which a lot of ground needs to be covered.



In the interview Nate mentioned some resources and organizations he finds helpful, find out more about them here:
Pioneer Square Labs: https://www.psl.com/
Unlock Venture Partners: https://unlockvp.com/philosophy
Founders’ Co-op: https://www.founderscoop.com/
SeaChange Fund: https://seachange.fund/
Pudget Sound Venture Club: https://www.pugetsoundvc.com/



About Seattle Angel:
A strong ecosystem creates an environment that allows startups to thrive. Seattle Angel’s goal is to strengthen Seattle’s startup ecosystem by increasing the access to funding for entrepreneurs to push their ideas further.



Seattle Angel Conference:
SAC round XVI is about to start. Are you an entrepreneur looking to get about $200k in angel funding? Are you curious to learn more about pitching, to polish all the documents needed for investments and to receive great feedback? Or are you an accredited business angel who wants to learn more about angel investing and due diligence? In any of these cases you should consider reaching out to us. You can find more information here: https://www.seattleangelconference.com/
For any questions please reach out to: sechrest@gmail.com



About the author: Sven Goepfrich

https://www.linkedin.com/in/svengoepfrich/

Sven Goepfrich is currently finishing his MBA in Syracuse. His studies focus on technology, innovation and entrepreneurship. At his school, he is working for the department of finance. Sven was actively interning with the Seattle Angel Conference in summer 2019. He is currently looking for full-time career opportunities in this field.

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Startup-People of Seattle: Lawrence I Lerner (VC)

The blog-series “Startup People of Seattle” introduces some of the key personas in the ecosystem to learn more about what they are doing, to share their thoughts and ideas, and to promote networking. 


In our fourth interview, meet Lawrence I Lerner:
“Founding a company together is a relationship. Thus, cofounders want to make sure they are a good personal fit.”
Lawrence I Lerner has been actively involved in leadership roles in 15 startups. Today, he is General Partner of a Seattle-based Venture Capital fund.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/lawrencelerner/




Q: Could you please shortly introduce yourself?
A: I started my career as a 2nd gen internet developer coding since the mid-80s. I have always worked with edge technologies trying to find ways to make technologies every day. I’ve been involved with designing, building, and promoting leading edge payment systems since the late 80s.
Q: Having had such a long career with startups, what have you learned about entrepreneurship? What makes startups successful and what are common mistakes founders make?
A: It is always about the team. The team should have the relevant skills and startup experience. Aside from that, one thing cofounders must realize is that they will work together for several years and they will go through difficult times together. Founding a company together is a relationship. Thus, cofounders want to make sure they are a good personal fit. Too often they do not explore this enough before deciding to cofound a company. Cofounders may connect at a meetup for example, think greatly of each other’s expertise, and decide to start a business together. Later they discover habits in each other that are incompatible, and the team has issues. When we observe teams during a pitch, watching their body language is key. 
Another important thing for startup success is that the entrepreneur understands the market place and trends, and that he has a clear strategy in mind how to get into the market place. Data is very important, and many entrepreneurs are not concerned enough with that. The same applies to finances. To give an example, a business owner I know owns a spa. Looking at data we could discover that most appointments are booked on Sunday afternoons. Given this, it makes sense to target most advertising resources on Fridays and Saturdays. It’s a simple example but indicates the power of knowing your data.
When it comes to finances, an entrepreneur must have a deep understanding of how they will use the proceeds from an investment. How it’s distributed (e.g., salaries) and how long it will last. Interestingly, founders often ask for too little money. Investors want startups to survive 18-24 month with the money rather than the startups having to come back to ask for more money frequently.
Q: What criteria should a startup look at to evaluate a potential investor?
A: Startups should gain more than just funding. They should be able to leverage the investor’s experience and network, so there should be synergies. Investors who think like founders (possibly from previous experience) are aware of the different needs of early stage companies. If they ask the right questions, that can also be very valuable to a startup. Another important aspect is, again, the human connection. Likewise, the relationship between cofounders, the relationship between startup and investor is a long-term relationship. So there needs to be trust etc.
Q: In your current role, you are General Partner of a Venture Fund. Could you talk a bit about the company?
A: The fund was formed about two years ago. Our investment thesis is to invest in blockchain infrastructure, such as wallets. Outside the blockchain world, streets provide transportation infrastructure for example, just so you better understand what I mean when I say we invest in infrastructure.
Q: What documents do you ask for from entrepreneurs when evaluating startups?
A: We ask for sales plan, business strategy, management bios, technology, and financial projections. We also check whether they are good at accepting critical feedback and we want to make sure they did their legal homework. This is important particularly in blockchain.
Q: Lastly, somewhat unrelated to the other questions, what recommendation would you give a college student interested in a career in a VC firm after graduation?
A: Have one thing that you are very good at. This could be finance or market analysis for example. Networking is also a very valuable skill to have. Another thing I learned is to ask questions instead of telling people things. For example, instead of telling an entrepreneur that he is not prepared for a sudden peak in demand, I would ask something along the lines of ‘What would you do if tomorrow you received 10,000 orders?’ 


Here are some things I learned from this interview:
  • Cofounding a startup is a long-term relationship. Making sure there is a personal fit between cofounders is important.
  • An entrepreneur must have a deep understanding of a startup’s financials and the marketplace, and how to enter the marketplace.
  • Making data-driven decisions is key.




About Seattle Angel:
A strong ecosystem creates an environment that allows startups to thrive. Seattle Angel’s goal is to strengthen Seattle’s startup ecosystem by increasing the access to funding for entrepreneurs to push their ideas further.


Seattle Angel Conference:
SAC round XVI is about to start. Are you an entrepreneur looking to get about $200k in angel funding? Are you curious to learn more about pitching, to polish all the documents needed for investments and to receive great feedback? Or are you an accredited business angel who wants to learn more about angel investing and due diligence? In any of these cases you should consider reaching out to us. You can find more information here: https://www.seattleangelconference.com/
For any questions please reach out to: sechrest@gmail.com


About the author: Sven Goepfrich

Sven Goepfrich is currently finishing his MBA in Syracuse. His studies focus on technology, innovation and entrepreneurship. At his school, he is working for the department of finance. Sven was actively interning with the Seattle Angel Conference in summer 2019. He is currently looking for full-time career opportunities in this field.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Startup-People of Seattle: Michael Schutzler (Business Angel and CEO of WTIA)

The blog-series “Startup People of Seattle” introduces some of the key personas in the ecosystem to learn more about what they are doing, to share their thoughts and ideas, and to promote networking. 


In our third interview, meet Michael Schutzler:

“The intrinsic motivation of giving back really is an important part of angel investing to me. I became successful as an entrepreneur because others believed in me, and now I feel like it is time for me to do the same for others.” 
Michael Schutzler is serial entrepreneur, business angel and CEO of WTIA.



Q: Thank you for taking time for this interview! Your LinkedIn profile lists 23 positions. Could you please provide a quick overview of your career and how you got into startups?
A: Most of my career was in tech. I started coding computers when I was 14 years old, which was 43 years ago. I have had a couple of positions in established companies in the telco and in the printing and manufacturing industry for example, but when I moved to Seattle my interest in entrepreneurship deepened. I founded a couple of successful companies here and these successes provided me with the financial resources to be an angel investor today. As an angel investor I am jumping from one opportunity to the next launching products and creating companies.
Q: I’ve heard three different components related to startups out of this. The first was tech, the second being an entrepreneur and the third is investing in startups. Let’s talk about tech and your role as CEO of WTIA first.
A: Sounds good. WTIA is a nonprofit allowing 1100 tech companies to cooperate. These companies work on things together that they otherwise couldn’t do alone. For tech startups this is mostly related to their two primary challenges. These are access to capital and access to tech talent. When it comes to capital, WTIA is running pitch training programs. We also have an 18-month long training program that teaches selected startups on everything from raising capital to product management, marketing and building relationships with angel groups, VC’s etc. When it comes to talent, WTIA enables the member tech startups to offer benefits like healthcare to their employees. This is enormously important as competition for tech talent is very high. The reason WTIA is able to do this, is because by bringing together so many tech startups as a group, we can negotiate better terms with insurance companies. This makes offering healthcare affordable to our member startups.
Q: Great. You said that you have also been involved in founding several companies yourself. What are some of the things you have learned as an entrepreneur?
A: The same things that you can read in startup books. Based on my experience I find the literature to be very to the point. An entrepreneur must learn how to fail fast and learn from mistakes. A startup needs to be continuously adjusting their business model based on new insights. Not everyone is made for startups, so entrepreneurs must surround themselves with the right people. Recruiting people is one of the most important tasks of an entrepreneur. The last thing is, you must be a great storyteller. You can be very smart and have a great idea, but if you aren’t able to convey a good story, nobody will give you any money and nobody is going to work for you. So, you have to be a great storyteller to be a successful entrepreneur.
Q: What would you recommend someone who is new to the startup world? 
A: If you have never done a startup before, I think it is a good idea to join something like the Startup Weekend that Techstars offers. This brings like-minded people together who all have the desire to start a company. At the same time this is a great opportunity to get a first taste of what it is like to be an entrepreneur. I would also recommend going to coworking spaces like WeWorks, Pioneer Square Labs or Galvanize and start meeting people. If you have some subject matter expertise, like marketing for example, offer advice and fully immerse yourself in the environment that entrepreneurs find themselves in.
Q: Regarding the third hat that you are wearing, the hat of an angel investor, do you invest individually or in funds?
A: When I started 24 years ago, I only invested as an individual and I only invested in companies that I sourced. I didn’t follow or join anybody. I learned a lot that way and I did quite well. Over the last five years or so however, I have experimented with investing into angel funds like Alliance of Angels or Kereitsu. I am also a limited partner in a venture capital firm called Flying Fish LLC. So, in the last years I have experimented with this more passive form of angel investing, but most of my experience is as an active angel investor. 
Q: You said that especially through active angel investing you have learned a lot. What are some of the things you have learned about angel investing?
A: It is similar to what I have learned as an entrepreneur. It matters less what the product is, instead, what matters most are market opportunity and team. I have invested in brilliant technologies that have failed because the founders were not the right people and I have invested in great startups where it turned out the market just wasn’t ready.
Q: What is your investment thesis?
A: I don’t invest in things I don’t understand like health care, real estate or restaurants. I primarily invest in tech companies and I do an enormous amount of due diligence on the founding team. 
Q: If you say you invest in things you understand, what do you think of the tradeoff between this and diversifying your investment portfolio then?
A: The reason many angel investors, including me, invest in startups in their area of expertise is that most BA’s view investing in startups as a give-back. We hope for returns, but view our investments more as a grant that has a potential of a payback. We want to help startups be successful and the way we do this is not just by giving money, but by helping an entrepreneur in any way that they need. We offer our expertise, our network, and our money as well, but money is just one aspect of it. 
Q: How involved in a startup do you think an angel should be then and how do you think different opinions between angel and startup should be dealt with?
A: Most angel investors are a small percentage of the cap table. Therefore, the amount of votes an angel investor gets is small and the influence is limited. An angel investor should be respectful of that. To the extent that the entrepreneur wants and needs help, it is the angel investor’s opportunity to be as active as useful, but the entrepreneur should be the one asking for help. 
Q: As an angel investor, how difficult is it to lose money through investments, especially until getting first returns?
That’s a great question and with my answer I refer to the last two questions I have answered. If an angel investor as an individual is not prepared to lose the entire investment, then that angel shouldn’t be investing. The motivation cannot be just managing an asset class but must be helping startups be successful. The intrinsic motivation of giving back really is an important part of angel investing to me. I became successful as an entrepreneur because others believed in me, and now I feel like it is time for me to do the same for others. There is a psychological satisfaction in giving back to the system that made me possible. That satisfaction is much bigger for me than the one I get when I get returns. Aside from all that, angel investing also has helped me build a great professional network as well as network of friends, it has helped me become a better CEO and I have had a lot of fun.


Here are some things I learned from this interview:
  • Storytelling is a must-have skill for entrepreneurs.
  • Angels should not simply view their investments as an asset class. Instead, the component of intrinsic motivation is important for BAs. BAs should use their expertise and network to help startups whenever founders ask for help. 
  • The two key challenges for BAs are: 1) Having the courage of writing a check knowing the money will probably have to be written off, and 2) Having the courage of keeping the mouth shut when not being helpful/ when not asked for advice. 


In the interview Michael mentioned some resources and organizations that he finds helpful, find out more about them here:
SeaChange Fund: https://seachange.fund/


About Seattle Angel:
A strong ecosystem creates an environment that allows startups to thrive. Seattle Angel’s goal is to strengthen Seattle’s startup ecosystem by increasing the access to funding for entrepreneurs to push their ideas further.


Seattle Angel Conference:
SAC round XVI is about to start. Are you an entrepreneur looking to get about $200k in angel funding? Are you curious to learn more about pitching, to polish all the documents needed for investments and to receive great feedback? Or are you an accredited business angel who wants to learn more about angel investing and due diligence? In any of these cases you should consider reaching out to us. You can find more information here: https://www.seattleangelconference.com/
For any questions please reach out to: sechrest@gmail.com


About the author: Sven Goepfrich

Sven Goepfrich is currently finishing his MBA in Syracuse. His studies focus on technology, innovation and entrepreneurship. At his school, he is working for the department of finance. Sven was actively interning with the Seattle Angel Conference in summer 2019. He is currently looking for full-time career opportunities in this field.